David Nash

"Overall, it has been a thoroughly enjoyable experience, which has taught me a lot and will have an impact on my future career direction."

Last summer, David Nash was awarded a bursary to join Professor Coleman’s group at the University of Bath on a project entitled 'Near-surface nanoscale structures probed by positron beam spectroscopy'. The project was designed to look into how atom-sized defect structures in silicon occur and evolve. The defects – known as vacancies – migrate when the samples are heated and can be studied using a technique called slow positron annihilation spectroscopy. David’s task was to look at two different sample sets and see how the defects behaved in each sample (crystalline silicon, and crystalline silicon with a layer of silicon oxide buried beneath the surface).

Speaking of his time working with Professor Coleman, David said:

“I have found the bursary experience to be a very enjoyable and interesting time, and have had the opportunity to learn a great deal about research, its practises and routine. I have had the experience of following a project plan from begninning to conclusion, mostly working independently to achieve the objectives, to a schedule and dealing with any problems as they arise."

"The scheme has given me a positive experience of research and I will look into future research opportunities and I hope to be able to go on to do a PhD at the end of my degree. Overall, it has been a thoroughly enjoyable experience, which has taught me a lot and will have an impact on my future career direction.”