invertebrate

Movement of seed beetles

Class practical

In this investigation, the speed of seed beetles is measured during horizontal and vertical movement.

Lesson organisation


This could be carried out in groups, with tasks allocated – timing, recording timings on paper, calculating speed, manipulating the seed beetles, and so on.

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Using a choice chamber to investigate animal responses to stimuli

Class practical

These notes explain how a choice chamber is set up, and how to use one to provide adjacent environments with different environmental conditions. You can then introduce small invertebrate organisms into the chamber, at different starting points, observe their movements, and record their distribution after a fixed time.

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Brine date

Class practical

Artemia salina (brine shrimps – commonly known as 'sea monkeys') kept in a brightly-illuminated aquarium provide an easily-observed and sustainable ecosystem for classroom-based ecological and behavioural studies by students at Key Stages 3 and 4 or Scottish Stages S1–S4 (Dockery and Tomkins, 2000).

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Investigating factors affecting the breathing rate of a locust

Class practical or demonstration

All organisms depend heavily on their gaseous environment to supply them with oxygen and remove their waste carbon dioxide. This procedure explores the effect of a change in gaseous composition of the atmosphere on an organism’s breathing. Two hypotheses could explain the change in breathing rate:

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Investigating factors affecting the heart rate of Daphnia

Class practical

british pharamacological societyIn the water flea Daphnia, the single, small heart is easily visible when viewed under transmitted light under a low power microscope. The heart rate (which can be up to 300 beats per minute) can be monitored and counted in different conditions – for example changing water temperature, or changing the type and concentration of chemicals added to the water.

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Dissection of the ventilation system of a locust

Class practical

Dissections provide information that can complement the information obtained from investigations of living animals. For a complete account of a process such as ventilation, students will need to understand both structure and function in the systems observed.

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Observing blood circulation in Asellus

Class practical

The movement of blood in the limbs of the small freshwater crustacean Asellus – the water louse – can be clearly seen with a low-power microscope. Capturing and mounting the crustacean should allow your students to make good observations of fluid moving in the limb quite quickly.

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Observing earthworm locomotion

Class practical

Introducing students to activities involving close study of animal behaviours is worthwhile in itself. It clearly takes time and effort to ensure that students handle the animals appropriately, make good observations, and record those observations.

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