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January 31st

Target of 3 million apprenticeships and new funding system risk poor value for money

In April 2017, the government is introducing an ‘apprenticeship levy’ (a 0.5% tax on an employer’s paybill above £3 million per year), which is estimated to raise £2.8 billion in 2019–20. At the same time, it is introducing more generous subsidies for employers training apprentices in England. However, government spending on apprenticeships in England is only expected to increase by £640 million between 2016–17 and 2019–20.

January 24th

Older teenagers and young adults quicker to learn maths skills than younger teenagers

Older teenagers and young adults are able to improve their fundamental maths skills and reasoning abilities more rapidly than younger teens, according to research undertaken by Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore at UCL and funded by the Nuffield Foundation.

These findings contrast with the common assumption that 'earlier is better' for learning and highlight late adolescence and adulthood as a potential window of opportunity for educational interventions.

January 19th

Sir Tony Atkinson 1944 - 2017

Sir Tony Atkinson, renowned economist and one of the world's leading thinkers on inequality and poverty passed away on New Year's Day 2017.

January 13th

Sir Brian Young 1922 - 2016

Former Director of the Nuffield Foundation Sir Brian Young passed away in November 2016. 

Young people could be limiting future salaries by dismissing A level maths

A new report funded by the Nuffield Foundation has found that 80 per cent of 17-year olds disagree with the idea of making maths compulsory post-16 even though there is evidence that those with A level maths earn more later in life. 

January 3rd

Subject choices at GCSE may exacerbate social inequalities

Young people from less advantaged homes may limit their options for further education unnecessarily when choosing their GCSE subjects.

A study from the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) funded by the ESRC and the Nuffield Foundation found that pupils from lower socioeconomic backgrounds were less likely than their more privileged peers to choose GCSE subjects that would enable them to go on to university – regardless of whether or not they were academically able.